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I have always been interested in the Brontë sisters since I knew that the original school that they attended, at Cowan Bridge, is only a twenty minute drive from where I live. However, much local talk and histories has revealed the link between the Brontë sisters, and my home in the Dales, is stronger than I once thought.  It appears that a local slave was inspiration for Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights, and worked only five minutes away down the valley. The author, Emily Brontë, described Heathcliff’s skin colour “as dark as though it came from the Devil”. Until now, this…

As I’m sat here eating a packet of Space Raiders, for the first time in ages, I’ve decided something: the 90s were, when all is said and done, a particularly peculiar decade. With this review I’m going to take a look back at some of events that I think shaped the final ten years of the 20th Century; from the toys that defined our childhood to the pop culture that brought about a new age of music and TV. Bursting with colour, mainly vibrant, those years were, for many of us, as formative as reading a Roald Dahl book. For…

After some weeks of rehearsals in a frosty JP Hall, BEDS (Bangor English Drama Society) staged five performances over three days of their first play of the calendar year; Our Father. Penned by an associate of the group, the play is set in the fictional Hawkswaite, Lancashire. The drama unfolds when the father of the family dies, bringing all members of his immediate family together. But all is not well and the reunion is thorny.  In the ten years since they were all last together, nobody in the family is completely happy with the life they have since acquired and…

On Christmas day in ‘98, as Britney’s neon pedal pushers (you know you bought a pair!) shone brightly on my wall, I was not the only ‘90s kid to get my paws on a really useful copy of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical, Cats – on video! The musical score was born when Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber set TS Eliot’s poetry collection, Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, to a musical score. The decision of the Really Useful Group, the theatre and media company founded by Sir Lloyd Webber himself, to release the musical on video in 1998 was not a…

As I’m sat here eating a packet of Space Raiders, for the first time in ages, I’ve decided something: the 90s were, when all is said and done, a particularly peculiar decade. With this review I’m going to take a look back at some of events that I think shaped the final ten years of the 20th Century; from the toys that defined our childhood to the pop culture that brought about a new age of music and TV. Bursting with colour, mainly vibrant, those years were, for many of us, as formative as reading a Roald Dahl book. For…

If you happened to be passing JP Hall on the 24th, 25th or 27th of November, and saw Roman soldiers, noble ladies and gentlemen with daggers running around, fear not! Following their enormously ambitious – and successful – 48 hour play project, the first full production by the Bangor English Drama Society (BEDS, to those in the know) of the new academic year took place. And what better way to kick off a new semester of theatre than with one of Shakespeare’s Roman histories, Julius Caesar. Julius Caesar is all about politics; it portrays the conspiracy against the Roman ruler…

It does feel like years since he’s been here; this 29th November marks the tenth anniversary of the death of the youngest and quiet Beatle, who lost his battle with lung cancer at the age of 58. George Harrison was the finger-picking genius of the four-piece, performing the finger style sections in the instrumental breaks of the band’s most memorable hits. Honey Don’t is an early Beatles cover of a Carl Perkins song, in which Ringo Starr -unusually the singer on the track- warmly instructs “Rock on, George, one time for me”. You can then hear Harrison vocalising through the…

The issues of Racism impacting international students Growing up under the classification of ‘British Asian’ has always helped to provide a security amongst those of South Asian origin, with regards to our national identity. I had always found pride in the ease with which I had found myself being accepted as British. This was only re-enforced by coming to Bangor University, and so it came as a massive shock when after seven months of living in France as an English language Assistant, somebody point-blank refused to accept that I was British. Of course it did not come as that much…

From the portraits, of one England’s canonised writers and the greatest of the entire Victorian age looks to have had a moneyed upbringing, a comfortable life and good education. He sits calmly, yet inspired, and looks as if his mind is on the edge of grasping a literary landmark plot or character as it   blossoms inside his thoughtful mind. He is habitually portrayed smart and besuited, seated pensively in a fine wooden chair with curved armrests, and appears to be quite at home in an exclusive library or prestigious gentleman’s club. The paintbrush lies. Charles John Huffam Dickens may…

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