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If you’re triggered by the subject of rape and dubious consent do not read on. In April 2012 footballer Ched Evans was found guilty of raping a 19 year-old girl. The girl had been under the influence of alcohol, which at the time sparked many debates on what exactly counted as full consent. Recently Ched Evans’ case has been brought back into the public light, should he be able to play football again and was there a miscarriage of justice in his trial? Now, I’m not here to debate whether or not he was guilty but what I do want…

SAORImôr is a weaving studio located just off Bangor High Street. The studio offers lessons in SAORI Weaving, a special type of Japanese weaving created just 40 years ago! Seren were invited by owner Rosie Green to go and try our hand at the Japanese art of SAORI Weaving, which we were more than enthusiastic to try, I myself have been bitten by the craft bug recently so this particular Seren excursion was right up my street! At first we weren’t too sure where the little studio was but as we rounded the corner by the railway bridge on the…

We take a look at what Bangor has to offer you at Serendipity this year! Serendipity Societies MUSoc (Bangor University Music Society) Chair: Hephzibah Leafe What we do: We run both an orchestra and a choir every week. We perform in three large concerts every year, two of which are just for Music Society, and we often raising money for various charities. Our emphasis is on having fun, and absolutely anyone of any ability is welcome to come along. THERE ARE NO AUDITIONS! Hopes for this year: We have a great selection of pieces planned which includes a wide range…

For Bangor City the 2013/14 season ended on a massive high when they defeated rivals Rhyl FC 2-0 and booked their place back in Europe. Seren took some time to catch up with manager, Nev Powell, back in May to find out how he felt about the season. It’s probably fair to say you had a bit of a tough start to the season, with a very young team. To end the season back in Europe must feel great, especially after not having such a great start? Yeah, we’ve always had quite a young side but at the end of…

You were here last year playing in Bangor in PJ Hall. How do you enjoy being in Bangor, and what’s it like as a venue? It’s a big venue and it has it’s own characteristics soundwise because of that. It’s always interesting do a sound check but people come in and change the sound. It has such great character, with all that wood and it’s beautiful, and nice people run it. But more than that I’ve spent a lot of time in Bangor myself, having fun and I have friends living here, so I do love coming back to Bangor.…

With the UK railway system covering nearly 10,000 miles across the country and over a billion journeys per year, the British Transport Police (the police force specific to the rails) has their work cut out for them. Seren Editor Becki met up with Sergeant Tony Stamp, PC Carol Stamp and PCSO John Steele form the Bangor Team to find out more about how they’re working to make travelling on the railways safer for students. What is the British Transport Police and what are its main aims? The British Transport Police is basically the national police force for the railway system…

When Jordan McKee first turned up on our screens we were unsure what to think of her. She had a trouble that meant anyone she touched would writhe in pain and quite frankly, with her being a member of the mysterious Guard, that was quite a terrifying prospect. It wasn’t long before Jordan won the fandom over, she was tragic and she was brilliantly played by actress Kate Kelton. Now in season four it looks as though we’re about to see a whole other side to the troubled spitfire in leather.  This week Seren’s LJ caught up with Kate to…

This coming October 27th, 2013 would have been Dylan Thomas’ 99th birthday, or as the very man himself would call it, his “99th year to Heaven”. Born in Swansea, Glamorgan and a pupil of the local grammar school where his father was the headmaster, Thomas was a contributor and later editor of the school newspaper. He carried his wordsmith abilities over the threshold into the adult world: he left school at the age of 16 to work for the South Wales Daily Post. His poem Before I knocked is about a child in utero and is not the only Thomas…

It may be in a rainy and industrial city, but inside you could be anywhere; Ancient Egypt, the Bronze Age, the jungle or under the sea are just four possibilities. The Manchester Museum holds displays on all manner of things from ancient and far away worlds. It exhibits not only artefacts from the natural world but also the relics (literally, in some cases!) of human history from yester-milennia. Terry Deary, who wrote the Horrible Histories books, greets you with a welcome talk on a modestly-sized cinematic screen as you enter. What greets you thereafter is an Ancient Egypt exhibition; mummified…

This month Seren decided to find out a little bit more about the winner of Seren’s Local Business Awards: Best Restaurant and met up with co-owner Mary Phillips.  How long has Noodle One been around? I think it’s been around for about five or six years now. It was quite well established which was nice. It made it easier for us. How long have you been in Bangor as a business? Well, we bought Noodle One in October last year but my partner, Iwan and I have both been previous employees here. We’ve had a good ten months so…

Bletchley: Home of the Code Breakers. Britain: Home of the Moral Code Breakers? Why I believe it’s right to celebrate Alan Turing’s Achievements on Trafalgar Square’s Fourth Plinth. Last month, I stumbled upon a disused Daily Mail on a train to Euston, and what I found inside should be entitled ‘The Daily Hate Mail’. It was a cruel article entitled ‘Why I believe it’s wrong to pardon Bletchley Park code breaker Alan Turing for breaking the anti-gay laws of his time’ (sic!). Was this journalist even aware that without the efforts of timid, homosexual mathematician Alan Turing at Bletchley Park,…

Will Self: Kafka’s biggest fan. You may know Will Self as a Grumpy Old Man, a BBC panellist, a writer, journalist or as a critic. He is the author of nine novels including ‘The Book of Dave’, centred around an unwell taxi driver and seven short story collections, notably ‘Grey Area’. Self is also quite possibly the biggest ever fan of Franz Kafka (1883-1924) and BBC Space is currently feeding his insatiable appetite for the Prague writer. The programme ‘Will Self’s Prague Journey’ is currently available on the BBC Space website, and it follows Self as he traces Kafka’s footsteps…

On Tuesday, 16th July 2013, Lancashire crime writer S.J. Boulton visited the bright lights of Leighton Buzzard to give a talk entitled ‘Folklore and Forensics’. It is fair to say she has something of a Bedfordshire following, set to grow upon the film release of her novel ‘Sacrifice’, currently in production in Hollywood. S.J. Boulton never thought she could write professionally; “My friend Ruth was far more able, and if either of us would ever become a writer, it would be her”, she modestly tells her audience of poised and intent bookworms.  Her first career was in PR, a life…

In September 2013, United States Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey will enter a second term of Laureateship. On 19th June, 2013, Seren’s Culture Editor went to see her address a mainly American audience at London’s Royal Automobile Club, Pall Mall. Composers start with chords and songwriters with an idea. In her poetry construction, Natasha Trethewey starts with a point in history and with “an historic al question that I will then attempt to answer through my poems.” Trethewey explains that she chooses to answer her self-set historical questions in order to “make peace with our own personal past and our country’s…

Wystan Hugh Auden was a northern English poet born in 1907.Though he was born English he later became an American citizen. Amusingly, this is the direct mirror image of a contemporary, ‘British’ poet also known by his first two initials: T.S. Eliot was conversely born American and later gained British citizenship. Auden led something of a nomadic existence. Born in York (pictured), he spent a childhood in Birmingham between terms of boarding education in Surrey.  He spent his adulthood in America and died on mainland Europe, in Vienna. As a poet and thinker, he wrote of and was plagued by…

Teesside novelist Pat Barker (a female ‘Pat’) is perhaps best known for her Regeneration Trilogy, which is set in the First World War and follows the lives of men deeply affected by shellshock. For a reader who follows Barker, her first novel, Union Street, can be regarded as an overture to this author’s strong ability to write in a mesmerisingly addictive style to achieve graphic and horrific accounts of real events. Union Street is, like Regeneration, firmly rooted in historical events. The novel set in the North East (and in an unspecified town, possibly in Durham or York) at the…