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Browsing: Entertainment

Aretha Franklin is regarded as a global blues legend and will long be remembered as one of the best-selling music artists of all time. The ‘Queen of Soul’ died on August 16th following her fight with cancer. The ‘Queen of Soul’ championed global hits such as ‘I Say a Little Prayer’, ‘Respect’, ‘Think’ and ‘You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman’ which established her as an iconic figure in music. Franklin also collaborated with artists such as Annie Lennox and George Michael in the duet ‘I Knew You Were Waiting For Me’. The soul singer also had a cameo…

Here is a look ahead at some of the biggest games that will be coming out during the next academic year, up to exam season. September: Marvel’s Spider-Man (PS4 – 16) In his latest game, the friendly neighbourhood superhero has been around for eight years. In this outing, Peter Parker has the entirety of Manhattan to explore, which opens the game up to many different activities for the players, from fighting crime to photography. The scale of the game is important as he investigates a mystery that brings up comic book characters and rogues that span the whole of…

Now TV – The Last Jedi Possibly the most divisive film of recent memory, Rian Johnson’s The Last Jedi joined Now TV’s roster this past month. It’s a subversive, challenging sequel and a course-changing outing for our heroes and the villains; a film all about letting go of the past and embracing the future… plus Porgs! If you liked it when you first saw it, you’ll love it even more when rewatching; if you hated it, there’s no better time to give it a second chance; and if you haven’t seen it before, boy you’ve got some catching up to…

Agatha Christie was born on September 15th, 1890, in Torquay, Devon. She was the youngest of three siblings and was educated at home by her mother, who encouraged her daughter to write. As a child, Christie enjoyed fantasy play and creating characters. When she was 16, she moved to Paris for a time to study vocals and piano. She published her first book titled ‘The Mysterious Affair at Styles’ in 1920; the story focused on the murder of a rich heiress and introduced readers to one of Christie’s most famous characters, Belgian detective Hercule Poirot. Writing well into her later…

Band of Brothers This gritty, true to life, occasionally heartwarming war drama follows the American Easy company as they wade into the Second World War coming across brutal skirmishes, deserted villages and horrific war crimes. Featuring some stellar performances from a relatively unknown cast at the time, many who would go on to become household names, including Damian Lewis, Ron Livingstone and Donnie Wahlberg. Plus, who doesn’t want to see Ross Geller make a fool of himself as Easy Company’s boot camp Captain Sobel. Highlight: Cameo performances from a pre-fame Michael Fassbender and James McAvoy Where: Sky Go, Amazon…

A hushed incredulity sweeps onlookers of the Walled Garden stage; a communal, subconscious recognition of the uniqueness present before us. Piercing through a delicate current of strings – Susanne Sundfor’s tender, effortless and, at times, soul-wrenching vocals. She softly purrs: “I’m as lucky as the moon.” No crowd rabble. Just pure, unadulterated stillness, and a sincere reverence given to every word. To call the Green Man attendee a ‘festivalgoer’ is quite possibly discourteous. Perhaps a more applicable term would be ‘aesthete’: a person with great sensitivity to beauty. Glanusk Park provides a haven for artists which, at other festivals, would…

Review written 14/05/2018. In amidst the hustle and bustle of the Palais, staggering from one pondering intense drama to another, each as bleak yet often as breathtaking as the last, sometimes what is truly needed is a comfortable watch to recharge the batteries and lower the brow from high, a smattering of chuckles and a story that fits like a pair of old slippers, familiar, a tad musty, but rewardingly well shaped to the beats of the path you have trodden many times before. Enter Sink or Swim, a quirky French comedy that follows the fictitious creation of France’s first…

Review written 13/05/2018. A haphazard adaptation of a literary masterpiece sadly executed with the conviction of a tepid dystopian YA fic – the only fire stoked in Ramin Bahrani’s Fahrenheit 451 is by the firefighters and, when trying to grapple with one of the most incendiary works in literary history, that simply cannot be enough. For a story that is centred around the power of the written word and the stories we tell and are told, this wouldn’t be missed if the bookpocalypse ever came to pass. This was a film anticipated feverishly for ages but one too that in the…

Review written 12/05/2018. A bit Baby Driver, a bit A Clockwork Orange in the protagonist, a little bit Scorsese, smatterings of Tarantino, but make no mistake, Luis Ortega’s The Angel is an absolute breath of fresh air. Stylish, slick, and with a soundtrack to die for – almost literally – crime never looked so cool. Newcomer Lorenzo Ferro takes on the role of “The Angel” – Carlos Robledo Puch – the real-life teenage serial killer, rapist, thief, and arsonist who sent shockwaves around the world 40 years ago, a real life Dorian Gray if ever there were one and all…

Review Written 12/05/2018. Preceding the screening, Jim Cummings said it’s okay to laugh, it’s okay to cry. I laughed, I cried, and it was brilliant. Without a doubt the sleeper showstopper of Cannes 2018. I wish more people knew about Cummings’ work, they only just about filled a 350 seat theatre for a man whose work is pure and powerful, yet Godard draws in thousands for an absolute mess just because of the weight of a name. Thunder Road is absorbed in the inglorious nature of grief, the attempts to salvage pride in our darkest moments and the inexplicable things…

Review written 11/05/2018. Oscar Wilde once said that all art is pointless. Jean-Luc Godard’s The Image Book makes a compelling case for the truth in that assertion. The film does almost everything a film can possibly do and is undeniably mesmerising, but I defy anyone who says Godard’s grand concept reveals itself in any way upon first viewing. Stunted snippets from over a century of art, cinema, and historic news footage, spliced with stunted snippets of sound and the droll utterances of Godard himself philosophising in broken translations form the entirety of the New Wave maestro’s latest step towards oblivion. Godard…

Review written 11/05/2018. Mads Mikkelsen is THE man. Move over Castaway, The Grey, All Is Lost, The Revenant… Arctic is the definitive Man VS Nature film. The film picks up several weeks into the plight of light aircraft captain Overgård (Mikkelsen), who finds himself stranded in the vast abyss that is the Arctic. His daily routine consists of baiting for fish, trying to pick up a signal to call for help, and working to keep a giant SOS sign carved into the ice. He has a primal machismo and a steeliness in the face of the unforgiving clime, resolutely waiting…

Review written 10/05/2018. I have just left the Grand Lumiere Theatre after attending the premiere of Zimna Wodjna – Cold War. My thoughts are flying away from me and all I am left with is absolute revelry. Out of nowhere a moment of luck and kindness granted me a chance to fulfil a lifelong dream, and there I was, walking the red carpet and taking a seat amongst the very people who I have spent a lifetime looking up to and aspiring to join. If ever there was a moment that could really change somebody’s life, this was it for…

Review written 10/05/2018. “We have one mother. One mother for all. She is sick.” So says a disaffected militant midway through Sergei Loznitsa’s Donbass, a pseudo-documentary with blacker than black humour that works only perfunctorily, a potentially smart move on Loznitsa’s part squandered by his inability to establish a tone and stick with it. And boy does he paint a very bleak portrait of his home nation, as lethargic as his directorial style. Using a vignette form with some admittedly well-executed transitions, Donbass takes aim at the fake news, fractured alliance, corrosive and explosive society of Ukraine circa 2014 but…

Review written 10/05/2018 So my first screening of Cannes 2018 has been and passed, after the hustle of getting into the majestic Palais I made the ascent to the quaint Bunuel theatre for a little publicised but much anticipated film, Willdlife. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Carey Mulligan alongside newcomer Ed Oxenbould, the film follows the breakdown of a small American family against a backdrop of the dramatic Rockies mountain range and the oncoming wildfire that is ever-building but never reaching, destroying on the peripheries of idyllic suburban America as a metaphor for the internal ruptures explored throughout. In short, I…

When you hear the name ‘Steven Spielberg’, closely followed by the words ‘new film’, your ears immediately begin to prick up and listen to what is being said about it. One of the most loved filmmakers over many generations, bringing us Jaws, Indiana Jones, E.T, Back To The Future, Jurassic Park; I could go on for the majority of this article. Despite all of his outlandish and mesmerising creations over the past few decades, Ready Player One has to be up there with one of the most imaginative. Ready Player One, based on the book by Ernest Cline of the…

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