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Browsing: Science

Scientific research is only at the beginning of understanding how climate change is going to affect aquatic organisms and how this will then affect entire marine ecosystems. Marine scientists have started to examine the effects of global warming and the reduction in seawater pH, known as ocean acidification. Studies undertaken by marine scientists from the School of Ocean Sciences has allowed for an appreciation that there are fundamental differences in the biological capacities of marine species, compensating for climate change. More specifically within crustaceans, a taxon that is usually regarded as tolerant to environmental change. It has been proven that…

Llama antibodies have now been incorporated in a recipe for a nasal spray designed to destroy infection from various strains of Influenza. Currently, the recipe has passed its first stage of animal testing and the results seem promising. Although, the medicine must undergo vigorous testing before human trials can begin, the development of this nasal spray may add a positive and much needed advancement in influenza vaccination development. The nasal spray could provide relief to the high-risk groups affected by influenza, such as the elderly or infants. Most traditional influenza vaccinations are tailor made each flu season, the nasal spray…

Witnesses are being encouraged to come out of the shadows to help shed light on a North Wales alien conspiracy.  Though, you may know nothing of the incident which has led to one of the greatest mysteries in North Wales, your lecturers may. At 8:30pm on January 23rd 1974 residents of Llandderfel and Llandrillo reported hearing a loud explosion, bright lights in the sky and experiencing ground tremors, which measured 3.5 on the Richter Scale. The police and RAF were dispatched to the area immediately but found nothing. Since 1974, rumours and stories have erupted into a massive debate on…

By Oli Hewson Bangor University has a Natural History Museum. This will be news to many of you, I’m sure, seeing as it has somehow remained a secret to me for almost three years at this institution. This may be partly down to the fact that admission to The Brambell Natural History Museum (no prizes for guessing where it is… Psst! It’s in The Brambell Building – sort of opposite Asda) is generally restricted to students of Natural Sciences at the University and rarely open to the public. When it is, however, it fills. Saturday 3rd was the weekend of…

The doors of Bangor University’s Centre for Environmental Biotechnology (CEB) have finally opened. The opening of CEB has placed Bangor University’s research at the cutting edge of research. The research centre aims to discover new enzymes with the potential to transform the efficiency of current biotechnology industries. The centre will be looking at extremophiles and how they can be used within industrial processes. Most industrial sectors such as pharmaceuticals, energy and cosmetics use inefficient chemical synthesis processes, which require high energy consumption and organic solvents, which are damaging to the environmental and public health. CEB aims to replace chemical synthesis…

Flu season is upon us, just as we all thought we were going to die from “Freshers Flu”, Influenza outbreaks have begun across the UK. As the country becomes increasing sick and run down, the NHS urges for the public to get vaccinated. In recent years there has become a significant divide between communities that believe everyone should get vaccinated and communities that believe that it is dangerous or just unnecessary. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that being vaccinated for influenza “can save lives” and “reduce the chance of the disease spreading”. But the real question…

Author: Oli Hewson There is some irony in that establishing Linguistics’ credibility as a science necessitates the use of a linguistic system. But onwards we shall proceed! Several theories attempt to explain how the mind defines and groups concepts (AKA “words”). Simplest (look to Occam’s Razor) is the Classical Theory. Basically, you group objects binarily based on their shared properties. Concepts either belong in the group or they don’t. Easy. (If you’re a biologist, replace “concept” and “object” with “organism”.) There’s a whole lot of logic that follows enabling the precise categorisation of each and every conceivable concept, but the…

Every September students from all over migrate to the small city of Bangor. After the heavy drinking period known as freshers, lectures begin in full-throttle. By mid-October, everyone is wrapped up and fully dosed with flu medications and feeling absolutely rotten. The plague of Freshers’ Flu has hit Bangor. We know most of you are probably feeling it, but is Freshers Flu an actual illness? One thing Freshers’ Flu isn’t, it is not a ‘flu’. Seasonal influenza’s, which emerge from South-East Asia, don’t usually present cases until December. There is, however, a very small chance that it could be the…

The marine environment off North Wales is renowned for its potential to provide significant quantities of renewable energy due to high tidal flows, which at specific locations can exceed 3ms-1 on spring tides. Improving our understanding and aiding the understanding of MRE developers at these sites, in terms of water flow, the nature of the seabed and the influence of marine renewable energy (MRE) infrastructure on the environment. Scientists based at the School of Ocean Sciences (SOS), have the capability to do this through access to the latest sonar survey technology and Bangor University’s fleet of research vessels. …

Brexit has influenced and will continue to influence our country. Some may argue that change is good and others will argue that it is bad, but this article will focus on the influence that Brexit will  have on the UK scientific community. The scientific industry is often overlooked in the national political discussion, despite its academic and economic importance. We have gathered all the facts to discuss, objectively, what is to come for scientific research in the UK. The EU produces one-third of the entire world’s scientific output, in terms of both economic value and intellectual capital. This is currently…

Dr Liyang Yue from Bangor University’s School of Electronic Engineering has been shortlisted for the prestigious 2017 Newton Prize for his project based on building a super-resolution metamaterial 3D printing system. The Prize aims to encourage researchers to participate in the Newton Fund as partners with the UK and to work on the most crucial challenges facing Newton countries. This year these include: India, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam. The concept has been developed to prove how UK partnerships with Newton countries are solving global challenges. It is an annual fund, which equals £1 million and is given to the best research…

A new display has recently gone on display in the foyer of Storiel. Entitled Scales and Tails, snakes, crocodiles and tortoises are just some of the specimens on display that are on loan from Brambell Natural History Museum which is part of the School of Biological Sciences at Bangor University. Several of the specimens are in jars of fluid and are still used for teaching. The display has been curated by Melissa Green, 34, a volunteer who is currently a 2nd year zoology and herpetology student at the university. She said: ‘It’s been a great opportunity to help educate people on…

Dr. Paul Cross is a senior lecturer at Bangor University and has studied a wide range of topics from illegal drug use to zoonotic disease. A few days ago I met with Paul to discuss the importance of British bees and how beekeeping might be beginning to alleviate poverty in sub-Saharan countries.  Why are British bees important? “Historically the British bee (Apis mellifera mellifera), was well adapted to conditions particularly in the UK (high winds, lots of rainfall, short summer, low temperatures etc…) and over millennia had adapted to the environmental conditions. However, beekeepers have been importing other races of…

Dr Catherine Duigan currently works for Natural Resources Wales, which was formed in 2013 by the merging of the Environment Agency Wales, the Forestry Commission and the Countryside Council for Wales (CCW), where she was initially employed in 1992. A few days ago I met with Catherine in a moderately trendy café to discuss her journey from education to employment and whether she had any tips for recent graduates looking for a job within the environmental sector. What’s your role at Natural Resources Wales and how has it changed since you began? “My current role is leading a group of technical specialists, of about 30 people, who are…

In the Conservative’s 2015 manifesto, it was stated that a referendum on Britain’s EU membership would be held sometime before 2017. With this referendum looming it’s important to take note of the world leading scientific research being produced in the UK thanks to EU research monies, especially in Wales. On the ninth of February 2014, Switzerland held a referendum. The proposal “against mass immigration” planned to limit immigration by implementing quotas and allocating jobs preferentially to Swiss nationals over foreigners. Heavily supported by the Swiss People’s Party, the proposal would send Switzerland back to the days before its freedom-of-movement agreements…

“Destabilising and provocative” says the United States as reports from state-run North Korean TV claim that, at 9.09am on Sunday the 7th of Feburary, Kim Jong-un’s nation successfully launched a satellite into space despite sanctions banning ballistic missile technology. An emergency meeting of the UN Security Council is to be held in New York City after Japan, South Korea and the US have called for a discussion on a response to North Korea’s space oddity. Space, and the fragile satellites that hang in it, are of key military importance. Peter Singer from the New America Foundation explains that satellites are…

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