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Browsing: Everything Else

I am a second year undergraduate student at Bangor University, and I am asking for your feedback! I have started an internship at university (remotely!) titled: Useful Hacks to Make Life at University Easier. The internship involves asking current students what they wish they had known before starting university. I will use this feedback to create a series of blog posts that aim to directly support and advise future Bangor students. This is a great opportunity to help new students settle in quicker and receive answers to their questions, whatever they are. So, while we are all staying at home in these…

This month’s country is the Netherlands. It is in Western Europe and borders Germany to the east, Belgium to the South and the North Sea to the Northwest. It also has a number of overseas territories in the Caribbean, located in the Lesser Antilles archipelago. Its capital is Amsterdam but the seat of the government and supreme court is The Hague. The population is currently 17.4 million living within 41,800 square km, making it the 12th most densely populated country in the world. The Netherlands is known for being very tolerant towards LGBT+ people due to its various legislation’s, but…

By Tom Wilkinson-Gamble The current economic war between Japan and South Korea has been raging for almost nine months now and shows no sign of stopping anytime soon. As a conflict between the world’s third and eleventh largest economies respectively, the dispute could have a serious economic impact on the rest of East Asia. Though the conflict began in July when Japan tightened regulations on the export of chemicals, its origins can be traced back to a South Korean Supreme Court ruling from November 2018. The court ruled that ten people, who had been forced into slave labour by the…

By Tom Wilkinson-Gamble Now that a few months have passed, we can begin to dissect exactly what led to the Democratic Progressive Party’s (DPP) victory over the Kuomintang (KMT) in Taiwan’s presidential and legislative elections earlier this year. January’s elections were an opportunity for the DPP to prove to the nation that they were deserving of another four years in power. The party had performed poorly in the 2018 local elections as a result of President Tsai Ing-wen mishandling a mixture of both domestic economic issues and relations with mainland China. However, after defeating Lai Ching-te in the primaries, Tsai…

In light of the recent Covid-19 pandemic, Y Seren will be going online for the foreseeable future and will be  focusing on its upcoming election for the 2020-2021 editorial team. All content will be going online and on social media, replacing the March and May print issues. The newspaper is also holding its yearly election and general meeting on Undeb Bangor’s website. All editorial and committee positions are open for applying by any student, with the exception of Editor-in-Chief which is only available to current editors. Nominations have opened and will close on 31st March. Voting will open on the…

As February is LGBT+ History month, I thought it would be interesting to look at this from an international aspect by assessing which countries are the best or most accepting of LGBT+ people. This will be assessed by considering different factors like anti-discrimination legislation, equal marriage, LGBT+ representation in the media, prosecution, discriminatory legislation and so on. This will more or less be based on the Spartacus Gay Travel Index 2019 which has been listing the best countries for LGBT+ people to visit or live in every year since 2012. North America: Canada is the most accepting of LGBT+ people…

Wales could meet 100% of its energy needs from renewable sources by 2035, under an “ambitious” new plan set out by policy experts Environmental Policy in Wales has long been at the forefront of the Climate movement with hefty targets for emission reductions and waste management strategies. Now, one aspect of the new policy has emphasised the need for reforestation of Wales and with targets to high – Welsh farmers have raised concerned of that this drastic land-use change will have the their industry. With Wales targeted to an 80% reduction in Carbon emissions by 2050, extensive measures must be…

Lent for many people is a time of giving up a favourite food or a bad habit, and for years I’ve given up things I love – I stopped drinking fizzy drinks, I gave up Bourbon biscuits (the horror!), and last year I went Vegan for lent. This year, however, I decided to go a step further than I’d considered before – giving up plastic; something that is found all around us, and is ever-lasting. With the hope of reducing my use of plastic, I embarked on this journey, aiming to challenge myself and see how possible it really is.…

Research led by Dr Christian Dunn from the Bangor University Wetlands group has found microplastic pollution in both the Afon Cegin and the Llyn Cefni Reservoir. Microplastics are defined as fragments or fibres of plastic that are less than 5mm. The most prominent source of the pollutant are car tyres; clothing; plastic pellets (use to make general plastic goods); paints and road markings. Previous investigations have shown the detrimental impact that ingestion of microplastics may have on aquatic life and their persistent qualities that enable bioaccumulation throughout trophic levels. Scientific investigations are still ongoing as to the consequences of these…

The media is full of scary and shocking descriptions as of late, and as I’m sure many of you are, I am panicked. Here I have digested some of the biggest topics of 2019 into more approachable and understandable concepts so everyone can get a true grasp on what’s happening in the world of science. Last year various naturalists and conservationist warned of an ecological apocalypse, but what does this really mean? The term encompasses everything that is going wrong in current world. Global populations of wildlife are declining at an extremely rapid rate, biodiversity and abundance of flora and…

No Such Thing as A Fish A weekly podcast from the writers of QI, where they discuss fun and obscure facts from the week. Some of the best facts include “the man with the world’s longest-ever beard broke his neck and died after tripping over it” and the “The Dalai Lama is frightened of caterpillars”. With over 200 podcasts are available on Spotify and it is a definite must listen whilst you soak up the summer freedom. As well as that it’s extremely funny and gives you great useless facts to wow your next tinder date with Death on…

New research reveals that farmed salmon have smaller ‘jaw hooks’ or ‘kype’- a secondary sexual trait, likened to the antlers of a stag, making them less attractive to females than their wild salmon cousins. This new finding published in the peer–reviewed science journal Royal Society Open Science, implies that farm-bred salmon are less sexually attractive than their wild brethren, and that despite only being bred in captivity since the 1970’s, within some 12 generations, that they are already diverging from wild salmon. The findings form part of a wider research project into the differences between wild, farmed and hybrid salmon.…

Research conducted by students at Bangor University, working with Friends of the Earth, has attracted global media attention. As mentioned in the last issue of Seren, Bangor University was commissioned by the environmental organization, to measure the amount of plastics and microplastics in British lakes and rivers- and what they found was widely reported in print and broadcast media across Britain and beyond. Luke Frears, 22 and Jedd Owens, 23 analysed all the water samples, filtering them and counting the microplastic particles in the samples for the report, they also demonstrated that using fluorescence during microscope analysis is an efficient…

Professor Simon Creer, a Professor in Molecular Ecology Georgina Brennan, Postdoctoral Research Officer, at the School on Natural Sciences release work using DNA analysis that may help allergy sufferers. With climate change hitting us hard our winters are becoming warmer, the plants are blooming earlier, it is expected that up to 400m people worldwide will develop allergic reactions to airborne pollen from trees, grasses and weeds. Symptoms will range from itchy eyes, congestion and sneezing, to the aggravation of asthma and an associated cost to society that runs into the billions. Creer and colleges at PollerGEN, have been working on…

Veganism is becoming more mainstream. The latest statistics from the Vegan Society state that the number of Vegans in the U.K. has risen from 150,000 in 2006 to over 540,000 just 10 years later. It has also been stated that moving towards a plant-based diet cuts land-use by 76% in comparison to meat diets. It would seem that Veganism promotes an all-round win for the planet, but how can we take that one step further? Living as a strict vegan for some years, I found myself wrapped in an all pervading definition of what I thought it was to live…

Aquaculture promises to feed an ever-growing population, replacing the ‘poor-man’s protein’ – rice –  with fish protein. However, the conversion from rice paddies to create aquaculture environments is having far reaching and unintended consequence for global warming. Researchers across the globe have been focusing their efforts towards understanding how anthropogenic actions affect the quantities of GHGs in the atmosphere. Key to understanding the underlying mechanisms of emissions are the microbial interactions inherent in soil processes. “Paddy fields produce huge quantities of methane when decaying plant material is broken down by microbes called methanogens in the oxygen-free waterlogged paddy soils. But in the…

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