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Browsing: Books

Anthony Horowitz in ‘The House of Silk’ gives us a brand new Sherlock Holmes adventure that attempts to be true to the Conan Doyle originals. We return once more to Victorian London, following Holmes and Watson as they investigate theft, murder and the mysterious House of Silk. Along the way we meet many familiar characters such as Inspector Lestrade and Mycroft Holmes. Somehow I’ve managed to get this far in life without ever actually reading a Sherlock Holmes story. Despite this I feel very familiar with the characters from being a big fan of the TV series ‘Sherlock’, BBC’s retake…

Dead Reckoning is Charlaine Harris’ 11th book in the Sookie Stackhouse series; the series which lends itself to the basis of the American TV show, True Blood. Although linked by character’s names, the TV show and book series have very little in common; if you didn’t like the TV show, but still want to add a bit of supernatural fantasy to your life, this is a really good series to peruse. Previous reviews have not been favourable to Dead Reckoning; the plot is slower and calmer than we’ve been used to in the last five or so books, and this…

If you head over to the travel section you’ll find an article on my recent trip to Palestine. In the week I spent there, I was also reading a book by Simon Sebag Montefiore called Jerusalem: A Biography. This particularly weighty tome coloured all of my experiences during my time there and has changed my entire outlook on the situation. The book explores the full seven thousand years of history of the city and each chapter looks at the particular dynasty or regime that controlled the area at different times. This way of telling the story of Jerusalem allows Montefiore…

Why do children love horror so much? We shouldn’t really be surprised that they do though; think about the fairy tales they are brought up on. Dark tales of death and destruction all spun in a way that makes them seem palatable for young ears but actually aren’t, yet they love them. Maybe this is why Goosebumps, by the American author R.L. Stine, has already started to become exceedingly popular. The first two books to be released in the series have gone down a storm with young readers everywhere, and the next book is being eagerly awaited. Stine’s style for…

We can’t really talk about the 90’s without mentioning the classic book from the decade: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone;  the one that started it all, way back in 1997. I remember being read this by my Year 4 teacher; near the end of every day she would sit us all down and read us a bit from this wonderful book she’d bought. We were all enthralled or, at least, I was. When we got to the end of term she hadn’t finished reading it to us and, with the long summer holiday stretching before me, I HAD to…

Elsewhere in this paper there is an article about the ineffable growth of eBook readers such as the Kindle. Over the last year these devices have gone from expensive toys to affordable tools available for the majority of people; with the release of even cheaper models there is sure to be increased sales for those buying them for Christmas presents. I have to be honest with you here: I do not like the concept of eBooks; the idea offends my bookwormish sensibilities. This is a very traditionalistic point of view but, when it comes to books, I’ve always been snobby.…

Marley was dead: to begin with. What other opening line conjures up that ebullient festive feeling that comes from the eerie mid-winter tale that is A Christmas Carol? Possibly the most well-known and retold Christmas story of all time, second only to the Nativity, Dickens’ short work is the perfect little read for the crisp nights leading up to the 25th. Have any of you actually ever read it though? The reason everyone knows the story so well is because the adaptations of it have been so prolific and, unlike other books, faithful. After all, who doesn’t know and love A Muppet’s…

There are some people, Ben Aaronovitch claims in his new book Moon Over Soho, who are born Londoners, even if they only visit for the first time in their old age. There are others who are born in London who never quite get it, and dream of escape. I fall into the first category. Despite being born within the gravity of the great city that is London, I am absolutely and incontrovertibly a Londoner at heart. There’s little about the city I don’t love, and as Aaronovitch says, “Every Londoner has their manor – a collection of bits of the…

Christmas isn’t just about new things; presents can be from a time before the internet – fancy that! Mortal Engines, the first book in the Hungry City Chronicles, tells the story of a future world where cities roam around feasting on each other for fuel. Based around the first ever mobile city, and now one of the last, London, the tale follows two different storylines. One is of an apprentice to the Guild of Historians who has been dragged off of the city by a would-be assassin. The other concerns the foiling of a fiendish plot by the Mayor and…

Bill Bryson – At Home The master of writing page-turning non-fiction, Bryson has once again delivered with this work about domestic history. Perfect for anyone who has an inquistive mind and a must for Bryson fans. Stephen King – 11.22.63 The prolific King’s first foray into historical fiction, 11.22.63 is a time travelling thriller. If you had the opportunity to travel back to 1958, what would you do: live in the past for five years in an attempt to save JFK? Jamie Oliver – Jamie’s Great Birtain This collates all of the recipes from the…